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Florida custom homebuilder Archives - cornerstonecustomconstruction

Different Degrees of Modern Style

By | Custom Home Construction, Custom Home Design, Design

The Modernist Movement originated before the start of World War I and gained momentum in the 1920s and ’30s with Walter Gropius’s Bauhaus School, an experimental housing in Stuttgart shown by the Deutscher Werkbund group. Today its legacy endures in modern architecture of various iterations all rooted in what was called “a new architectural language that breaks with the past.” 

Modernist Masters from Le Corbusier to Frank Lloyd Wright developed these new architectural techniques to meet the needs of society. Here in Florida, we lay claim to a regional modernism pioneered by the Sarasota School of Architecture, a group of pre-eminent practitioners.

 

Orlando Custom Homebuilder Jorge Ulibarri says modern architecture continues gaining popularity for its signature design elements such as flat roofs or subtle roof lines, intersecting geometric planes, walls of glass, and angular features. These elements of style reflect our current fixation on unadorned features, simple, clear forms and clean-lined decor filtered through a regional lens of Florida Modernism. One of the latest projects from this Orlando Custom Homebuilder is a 12-square-foot home in Lake Markham Preserve on a lakefront lot with sweeping water views. 

The home’s contemporary curb appeal draws visual power from its planar and geometric forms and large glass windows.

Inside, a color palette of white and gray highlights wood tones without competing with the panoramic lake views from large expanses of glass that flood the two-story home with natural light. 

The custom front door was designed by the owner and crafted in Mexico of wrought iron with a modern industrial look.

Two staircases crafted of wrought iron in a grid design with a fine finish, one on each wing of the home, connect to an open bridge overlooking the great room. 

Flooring downstairs is done in 30″ by 18″ porcelain tile and upstairs features gray wood plank floors.

 

Stacked gray stone provide visual and textural accents throughout.

The home has large windows throughout with corner windows in many rooms to drink in the panoramic lake view.

For more design ideas, check out Orlando Custom Homebuilder Jorge Ulibarri’s youtube channel.

 

 

The Kitchen Island Curves and Wraps In 2013

By | Custom Home Construction, Custom Home Design, Kitchen Design, Video Episodes | One Comment

The Latest Trends in Kitchen Island Design Trade Lines for Curves and Mixed Materials for Monolithic.

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The latest kitchen design trend creating a buzz at the International Builders Show has to do with the shape and make of the kitchen island.

Kitchen Island Curves:

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Still a must-have in any modern kitchen, the island is softening its linear look with curves that allow for round-the-table seating instead of shoulder-to-shoulder.

Kitchen Island Surfaces Go Monolithic:

MonolithicIslandNewAmericanHome

Countertops that wrap around the island base are showing up in the latest kitchen designs. It’s an aesthetic known as Monolithic. You’ll be hearing that word a lot in 2013. Monolithic design is defined as a single material that seamlessly wraps around a surface, wall, cabinetry or any other feature.

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Some of the best examples are in the concrete surfaces of kitchen countertops, very on-trend this year. Concrete is a malleable material that can be sculpted and molded to create a seamless surface.

Kitchen Island Doubles Up:

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The kitchen island is doubling up in some homes to offer more multi-tasking capabilities, surface space and storage. Orlando Custom Homebuilder Jorge Ulibarri says the double island is a great solution to a common kitchen design challenge: keeping the kitchen open while preserving storage space. “In one of my homes, the shape of the kitchen is square. Rather than enclose the kitchen with walls to create more surface and storage space,  I added the double island  to maintained the openness while providing this added functionality.”

In this example picture above,  Jorge designed two islands each with seven linear feet of countertop space that sit four feet apart.  The inner island, located in the kitchen center, will be monolithic, made of wraparound Carrera marble with white cabinetry underneath. The island facing out towards the family room features the same white Carrera marble countertop but with an espresso wood cabinetry base to compliment the floor-to-ceiling fireplace in the family room.

For more design ideas and money-saving new construction tips, subscribe to the video series, Trade Secrets, available on YouTube

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The Curb Appeal Power of the Tower

By | Custom Home Construction, Custom Home Design | No Comments

 

Tower Entry of Villa DiLusso, a home designed and built by Orlando Custom Builder Jorge Ulibarri

Tower Entry of Villa DiLusso, a home designed and built by Orlando Custom Builder Jorge Ulibarri

Eye-catching curb appeal, the kind neighbors rave about and passerby’s stop and admire, comes from a key focal point on the home’s exterior. The tower entry is a stunning visual anchor that goes with a variety of architectural styles and lends itself to almost any lot configuration and floor plan layout.

Tower Entry on a home on Park Ave in Winter Park, Florida designed and built by  Orlando Custom Builder Jorge Ulibarri

Tower Entry on a home on Park Ave in Winter Park, Florida designed and built by Orlando Custom Builder Jorge Ulibarri

It adds movement and character to a home’s elevation and creates a memorable first impression by making a grand entrance. Imagine entering into a lobby with a 24-foot high ceiling embellished with beams, a majestic chandelier and a spiral staircase that winds along the wall resting at a marble floor medallion. Such a grand entrance sets the tone of the home before anyone steps into the main living spaces.

Ceiling view of tower entry on home designed and built by Orlando Custom Builder Jorge Ulibarri

Ceiling view of tower entry on home designed and built by Orlando Custom Builder Jorge Ulibarri

In addition to its aesthetic value, the tower entrance is functional square footage when it accommodates the staircase. Without the staircase, the tower entry could be considered wasted, showy space adding a lot of square footage to the home with little function.

For Orlando Custom Homebuilder Jorge Ulibarri, the tower entrance is his signature trademark. Jorge says it’s the architectural ideal of form and function. “The tower entrance creates a dramatic lobby with high ceilings and provides the space for a spiral floating staircase so it optimizes square footage,” says Jorge. He adds this architectural feature to many styles including Mediterranean, Contemporary and variations in between.

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Tower Entry Front Facing on home designed and built by Orlando Custom Builder Jorge Ulibarri

Tower Entry Front Facing on home designed and built by Orlando Custom Builder Jorge Ulibarri

Tower Entrance Design Options:

There are two options with the placement of the tower entrance: the center or a corner of the home. The choice of where to place the tower entrance is a personal preference.

Center Tower Entrance:

Center Tower Entrance on home designed and built by Orlando Custom Builder Jorge Ulibarri

Center Tower Entrance on home designed and built by Orlando Custom Builder Jorge Ulibarri

When the tower is situated in the center of the home’s elevation, the design is limited to an entrance on a 45-degree angle. The front door cannot face the street because the spiral staircase won’t have enough distance from its starting point to provide clearance for people to pass underneath into the main living space.

Corner Tower Entrance:

Corner Tower Entrance on home designed and built by Orlando Custom Builder Jorge Ulibarri

Corner Tower Entrance on home designed and built by Orlando Custom Builder Jorge Ulibarri

The corner tower entrance is ideal because it is already situated on a 45-degree angle. This design allows the front door to face the street since it’s already an angle. A corner tower entrance provides enough space for the spiraling staircase to start either to the left or right of the front door, allowing enough clearance for people to pass through.

Center Tower Entrance on home designed and built by Orlando Custom Builder Jorge Ulibarri

Center Tower Entrance on home designed and built by Orlando Custom Builder Jorge Ulibarri

For more design ideas and money-saving new construction tips, subscribe to the video series, Trade Secrets, available on YouTube.

What’s Under the Roof?

By | Building Green, Custom Home Construction, Custom Home Design | No Comments

3 Questions to Ask Your Builder Before the Tile Roof Goes Up:

home designed and built by Orlando Custom Homebuilder Jorge Ulibarri

Determining the aesthetic details is the fun part of building your dream home but the “nuts and bolts” are just as important, particularly when it comes to what’s under the roof.

Orlando Custom homebuilder Jorge Ulibarri recommends that homeowners get involved in selecting the roofing company. “Just as homeowners do their homework when selecting the builder, they need to thoroughly research the roofing contractor. Roofs typically leak in the first year but deficiencies can surface years later. Anyone building a new home should make sure that the roofing company is reputable with a business track record that indicates it will be around for the long term to repair any problems with the roof,” says Jorge.

In addition to asking the homebuilder for recommendations, homeowners can research roofing companies by consulting the National Roofing Contractors Association or The Tile Roofing Institute.

Orlando Custom Homebuilder Jorge Ulibarri suggests three important questions homeowners should ask before their roof goes up.

What Type of Warranty Comes with the Roof?

According to the National Roofing Contractors Association, most roofs, whether tile or asphalt-shingle, have a life span of 20 to 25 years. A builder’s warranty typically lasts two to 10 years. During that time, coverage varies on different components of the home including structural, mechanical and electrical warranty guarantees. Once the builder’s warranty expires, the homeowner will have to deal directly with the roofing manufacturer or installation company to remedy any roof deficiencies.

What Type of Underlayment Will Be Used?

Underneath the roof tile or shingles is a membrane known as the underlayment. This membrane helps weatherproof the roof and prevents water intrusion. There are two types of underlayments available and both vary in price and quality.

The Peel-and-Stick Self Adhesive-

Peel-and-Stick Underlayment on roof of home under construction by Orlando Custom Homebuilder Jorge Ulibarri

This underlayment is made of synthetic material and has an adhesive backing that sticks to the roof’s plywood (roof decking). Unlike felt paper underlayment that is nailed to the plywood, Peel-and-Stick adheres to every inch of the roof decking and creates a secondary line of defense against water intrusion and wind damage.

Peel-and-Stick underlayment with black adhesive in view. This adhesive sticks to the roof decking to attach to every square inch of the roof decking evenly for a better seal.

Peel-and-Stick underlayment is more expensive (about 30 percent more than felt paper underlayment) but many homebuilders prefer to use Peel-and-Stick because it is more resistant to moisture, tears and UV rays.

Felt Paper Underlayment-

felt paper underlayment nailed to the roof decking

This underlayment, made of asphalt coated felt paper, is commonly referred to as tar paper. It is less expensive than Peel-and-Stick and less durable. One of felt paper’s limitations is that it is nailed to the roof decking so it doesn’t adhere uniformly. Installation requires layering of the felt paper to build a sufficient barrier.

Are There Energy Efficient Colors for Roof Material?

Cool roof color palette for tile roofs. Check with your roofing contractor and manufacturer for cool roof options.

According to the U.S. Department of Energy, lighter-colored roofing surfaces or special coatings can reduce energy usage by 10 to 15 percent. Lighter colors reflect more of the sun’s heat and reduce cooling costs by as much as 15 percent according to the Cool Roof Rating Council.

Cool roof tile in grey. Image courtesy of Collins Roofing. Lighter colors for roofing material and cut energy costs up to 15 percent.

Most roof tile manufacturers have a color palette that is Energy Star and CRRC approved as cool roof materials. Ask if the roofing product is available in a “cool roof” version.

The EPA has a Cool Roof Calculator at http://www.roofcalc.com  that quantifies the benefits of a cool roof. Some cool roofs also qualify for rebates, for more information, go to http://www.coolroofs.org/codes_and_programs.html#rebate

For more money-saving design ideas and new construction tips, subscribe to the video series, Trade Secrets by Jorge, available on YouTube.

Tips for Creating Tuscan Curb Appeal and Ambiance

By | Custom Home Construction, Custom Home Design, Kitchen Design, Video Episodes | 3 Comments
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Many of us are enthralled by the timeless architecture and breathtaking beauty of the Tuscan countryside. It’s a style that is emulated here in the United States, especially in similar climates such as Florida. Whether you are building a home or looking to remodel, you can bring this same European charm to your own home. Check out the latest episode of Trade Secrets as Custom Builder Jorge Ulibarri and host Karen LeBlanc take you on a tour of Villa Tuscany and share with you some affordable architectural accents that created its Tuscan curb appeal and ambiance. We invite you to share this video with others if you find the information helpful and check out other episodes of Trade Secrets on youtube